Navigating Your Career

The One Where I Get Interviewed

September 22, 2021 Melissa Lawrence Season 1 Episode 52
Navigating Your Career
The One Where I Get Interviewed
Show Notes Transcript

In this episode, the tables are turned…  It’s the one where I get interviewed (any Friends fans here?).

This is a very special episode.  

I can’t believe it but it has already been one year of the Navigating Your Career podcast.  

Every week I’ve been pouring my heart and expertise into delivering a show that helps you get happier, be more you, and overcome work challenges so you can live the life you want to have.

For this anniversary episode, I decided to let my children run the show.

Yep. They’ve been asking me to come on and interview me….for you.

And so, I have some special co-hosts this week - my son and daughter will be calling the shots and putting me in the hot seat.

They came up with some deep questions I didn’t expect!  They wouldn’t let me see them ahead of time and their questions and insights blew me away. 

They are not messing around!  

You’ll learn the things they think you should know about the work I do but also my guilty pleasure and what I’m really like in my “natural habitat” (as they say).

But don’t worry, I get to turn the questions around on them, too.

This was so fun for us to record and I hope it’s fun and inspiring for you to hear.



What You’ll Learn:

How I knew a coaching business was the perfect path for me

What I learned that changed my life

How I balance business and mom life

The key to making the world a better place (IMHO)

My advice for people who want to make a big leap in their lives… and for my 18-year-old self.


Featured in This Episode:

Learn more about coaching with Melissa. 

Are you questioning if you are in the right career? Take the quiz. 


Melissa

Welcome to Navigating Your Career, the only podcast that blends personal development, professional skills, and psychology to help you get happy at work and live the life you want. If you want to stop feeling stuck and start feeling better, this is the place for you. I'm your host, Melissa Lawrence. Let's get started.


Hello and welcome! This episode is so special. Why? Because it's the 52nd episode, which means we have been together every week for a year. For the past year, I have poured my heart and expertise into this show to help you get happy at work, to help you work on yourself, your beliefs, to know how to navigate even the most difficult situations, to grow professionally and even understand your brain a bit.


So for this week's episode and it is a very special episode, I thought we could do something a little different. My children are going to join us. Yes, my son and daughter, my son, Q, is 14 years old and my daughter is 11. I cannot believe it. For the parents out there, I'm sure you're just like me where you always see your kids as the babies they once were. They have been asking me to be on the show for months. In fact, my son Q pitched me the idea that they interview me on the show, that they give you a behind-the-curtains look into me, your fearless leader and coach of this show so that you can get to know me in a new way and see what I'm like in my personal life, too.


They thought that you would love this. So for this anniversary episode, let's give it a go. Well, let's go ahead and get started. Without further ado, here is me and my special co-hosts having a conversation about coaching, about life, and I may even put them in the hot seat. So give a warm welcome to my co-hosts, Q and T.



Q

Hello.



T

Hi, I'm T. Be prepared to hear some stuff you probably have never heard before.



Melissa

Oh, you're gonna make me a little bit nervous.



Q

What's something people seem to misunderstand about you?



Melissa

Oh, my gosh. I feel like I should have had these questions ahead of time. Okay. What is something that people misunderstand about me? Hmm.


I would say probably that it's always been easy for me to go beyond what's comfortable, to try new things, to do things that other people might find scary that I coached them to do, like making big pivots or doing something different than how they were raised. I think people sometimes assume that because it is something I've mastered now and that I teach people to do, that it just came naturally to me, and it's really something that I had to learn for myself.



T

Okay. Why did you choose to be a career coach when there are so many other jobs?



Melissa

Oh, my gosh. Do you know the answer to this question?



T

Because you like to help people? It's what you always say, but I want a bigger answer.



Melissa

You want a bigger answer? So the reason that I became a career coach is really, to be honest, that I just fell into it. So, I knew that I wanted to help people. And so I tried a lot of different things to do that. And, you know, that when I worked in a corporate job, that that's what I did in that part of my career. But it wasn't fulfilling enough. And I didn't feel like I could help people as much I could if I went on my own.


And like I said, about what people kind of misunderstand about me, I know what it's like to feel like there's something more for you and to not really have the courage or really the know how to figure out what that is. And so once I figured out how to figure that out, I wanted to help people do that, and I wanted to help them do it in a way that wasn't biased to anyone else. So it wasn't about what the company wanted or what their partner wanted, but just what they wanted for themselves.



T

Yeah. Makes sense.



Q

Okay, tell me about a client that touched your heart and tell me about a client that changed your practice.



Melissa

Whoa, did you Google these questions? Where did you come up with these? Okay. A client that changed my heart?



Q

That touched your heart and a client that changed your practices.



T

It could be the same person.



Melissa

Oh, my gosh. Okay, let me think. I really feel like this is going to sound cheesy, but this could be true of any of my clients. I feel like all of them I care about. All of them touch my heart. All of them make, like, impact my practice, because I always am thinking about what they want. How can I deliver what they want faster and more effectively? And then I take that on to the next client. But let me see if I can think of something super specific.


So my client that touched my heart is someone that had a lot of trauma, had some troubling things happen as she was growing up and that continued to happen as she was an adult. And it was really impacting the way she thought about herself, her happiness in her life, how she looked at relationships. And helping her overcome that was really incredible for me. I have gone through something similar and so to be able to help her overcome that and to see herself differently and to let go of that weight she carried is, that really touches my heart. Because when you do something like that, it just changes your life.


Like when you're no longer carrying that negativity and that shame and that questioning of your worth. And I would say a client that changed my practice, the one that comes to mind is really the first one. So the first career coaching client that I had is the first person that I took from beginning to end of my specific coaching philosophy and systems and tools. And she saw amazing results. And I feel like that was really validating for me because going in and starting a new business, you have the skills, you have the expertise.


And it really validated that what I was doing was working and it really helped people and that it was something that I could really take and grow with long term.



T

Very detailed.



Melissa

That's what you asked for.



T

Okay, when did you know yep, coaching is for me, I wanna do this 24/7 365, it's my thing, love it got to do it?



Melissa

When did I know? So it's funny. I feel like I know that coaching was my thing. Before I knew what coaching was, I think what I do with coaching, I was always doing with other leaders that I worked with, with colleagues. It's something that I now knowing what coaching is I was doing then, which is why I have some natural skill and ability in addition to the formal training. And I would say once I knew what it was, when I really went through certification and I had practice clients and went through that whole process, it really lit me up.


And I found I was going to work and even though I had a great job, it was draining. And I didn't look forward to it the way that I did my practice clients. I was working for free in the evening, essentially. And that gave me so much energy. And so I knew that that was something that I needed to pursue.



T

Well, you shine your light.



Q

Shine your light?



T

Yeah. She said about her light.



Q

Okay. If you could turn back time and talk to your 18 year old self, what would you tell them?



Melissa

I would say that you're not crazy and to keep going because especially when you're young, you question yourself sometimes and you can have some doubt. And when you want to do something that other people aren't doing, when you don't have an example of it, it can be easy to convince yourself that you shouldn't go after it and that you should just be happy with what you have. And for me, I feel like I've always had a calling to do something more to impact the world. I was 18 when I thought of having my first business and I just never let that go.


So even though I made other choices that help me get to where I was, I never silenced myself. But there were times I tried to convince myself that it was crazy what I wanted and that I shouldn't want it. And so if I could go back, I would tell that that 18 year old self to just not be so hard on herself and that there's a reason she wants those things.



T

Well, I guess on the note of back in time, if you ever went back in time to tell yourself, "I am a successful career coach and I've helped many people," would you believe yourself?



Melissa

Would I believe it? You know, I would believe it. I think that I would believe that I would be successful because I always work really hard towards everything that I want to have. I can believe that if I had a goal to be successful, that I would be. I think the level of self concept that I have and the way that I help people and how I help them having this business, that seemed really far fetched for me when I was younger. So I think that would have been harder for me to believe, but it definitely would have been nice for someone to tell me that that was possible and that it was going to happen.



Q

Yeah. Okay. What's the most important thing you've learned in life and in comparison to how your life, what is now, how was your life before you learn this thing?



Melissa

All of your questions are so deep. I would say the most important thing, and this is on the spot, So this is the question I need to have more time to think about. But what's coming to mind is really that every person, you guys are going to think this is so cheesy. But every person, or cringe as you would say, every person really is equal to everyone else. And it doesn't matter what other people's opinions of you are. They don't define who you are and what you're capable of and your worth as a human being.


You're like. Yeah, of course. And I'm glad that that's your response to it. When I was younger in the past, I think I questioned myself a lot. And even though I believe that of other people, it was harder for me to believe that of myself. Right? Which is often a problem that a lot of my clients have too. They give back and they believe in all these possibilities for other people. But when it comes to themselves, they see themselves as different and they can't do those things or it's harder for them.


And that's because we're all in our own brains, and that's what our brains do. I think that that was something that really opened the doors for me to really believe that to be true, not just that everyone is equal, but just that if someone else has an idea and you don't think it's a great one, good for you, but that doesn't mean it's not a good idea. And vice versa, right?  Everyone is going to have an opinion, and it doesn't matter what someone's title is or how much money they have or who they are.


Their opinion isn't worth more than your opinion. You just want to listen to people's different perspectives. But at the end of the day, what you want to do, your decision, your opinion is just as valid, as important as everyone else's. And I think once I learned that it really opened the doors like I stopped being afraid of trying new things, of what people would say or think when I did things like this business, for example. I just went after what I knew was right for me.



Q

So when did you learn that?  How did you figure that?  And, like, how old were you? What time of your life?



Melissa

I would say probably in my let's see, how old am I now? 40.



Q

So I thought you were 82.



T

Oh, my God.



Melissa

Are you confusing my birth year? Probably, I would say it was later in life. I would say early 30s.



Q

Early 30s?



Melissa

Yeah, like, I believed those things. But I didn't really wholeheartedly believe it in a way that allowed me to do things without necessarily worrying about other people. And how I learned to do that was really by pushing myself. I think I have a great capacity for believing in that voice that I have that tells me that there's more and that I can be the person that changes the world. I can be the person that helps people. And as cheesy as that sounds, that's what I tell you guys, too.


Like, you can be that person. I think there's a quote by Steve Jobs or something that says something like, "The people that think that they're crazy enough to change the world are the people that do." And so me believing, oh is that cringy?  Me believing that I could be that person and not leaving it to someone else pushed me to keep doing things that were hard. And the more I did that, the more I saw the reality. And, of course, I have a master's degree in psychology, that certainly helped.


I got better around that time as well. So I think it's a combination of education, experience, and really just the way that my brain works.



Q

Interesting.



T

Were you ever scared your new job wasn't going to work out for you? It's not new. But at the time when you started?



Melissa

Yes.



T

What were you most worried about?



Q

That was probably what was keeping you from doing it.



Melissa

Yes. Of course. I worked really hard to build my career where it was and to be as successful as I was. And I felt like, what if I did this and it failed? What if I have to go crawling back to corporate America because it didn't work out? What if no one actually wants to pay me money? What if people only were working with me because their company was paying for them to do it? I had all of those thoughts. But slowly, I guess it wasn't that slow, it worked pretty well.


The connections and relationships that I had really helped me. And having coached internally with companies, people knew who I was, they knew how I could help them. And so that really helped me transition into working for myself. But I for sure had doubts. Like I told Ellen that we should be prepared for me not to make any money for a year. It was like I'll probably make $10,000. And so we had prepared for that. But how I made that choice despite those, because this is just how our brain works, so our brain is there to protect us.


You know this, I tell you guys this, it's going to tell you not to do things that aren't necessarily bad to do, but are just protecting you from going out of your comfort zone. And so for me to help my brain be okay and make the decision to do my business anyway, I had to prepare for all of the worst case scenarios. So that's what I help my clients do, too. When they're scared to do something, let's talk about all of the worst things that could happen, and then how you would handle those things.


Like, are they really likely to happen? Because sometimes when we're scared, like, you just got your ears pierced yesterday, right? And you were really freaked out. You really built up all of this stress about it. But that was partly just because it was something new. You didn't know what it was going to be like and so you have to just kind of push through and figure out, well, what's the worst that's going to happen? Right. And then once you know how you would handle those things, it makes it easier to just move forward.


That's what I did.



Q

Well, good job. Okay. What is the best compliment you've ever received? But what is also an insult that you have received that you are proud of



Melissa

In relation to my coaching?



Q

No, just like in life. It can be in your coaching practice because you take lots of pride in your coaching stuff. So maybe one of your clients, like, complimented you, and that really changed the game or whatever.



T

What made you feel good?



Melissa

Yeah. I mean, any time that my clients tell me that I helped them, that they feel better, that they have less stress, that they are living differently, thinking about themselves differently when I see them going after things they wouldn't otherwise like new jobs or trying new things they've always wanted to try. That makes me so happy, because the mind is so complicated. But it's also relatively simple if you know how to hack it, and to have people that have real stress and real doubt and real confidence issues come to me and by the time they leave or even just after a couple of weeks, they feel confident and empowered and they're standing up for themselves. That just, it almost makes me cry every time it makes me so happy.


And personally, I would say that, you know, when you guys when El, when the people my family just tell me that they love me, that is such a nice compliment for me. Like, that makes me feel warm and fuzzy.  And an insult, well, I've never been insulted.



Q

In your whole life never been?



Melissa

I'm just joking. In my corporate life, I was told on several occasions that I am always striving to give the Nordstrom level of delivery with what I do.



T

I have no idea what that is. 



Q

Yeah, what is Nordstrom?



Melissa

It's like a high level, high level store delivery. So imagine if you go designer clothes versus if you get clothes at a rummage sale. It was kind of giving me that comparison. I was saying that, which was kind of an insult, where it was saying, you always want to give this high end, but people just want the rummage sale version.



T

You're, like, bougie.



Melissa

I don't know about that, but yeah, but so that's something that I'm proud of because I do always strive to overdeliver. But I do think that that is something you have to consider in a corporate world, which is also why I like working for myself is that in a corporate world they might not want the amazingness you have to offer. It might be about giving them the lowest level that you can offer. But for me knowing I could do more, that wasn't good enough.


So that is one thing for sure. And another is I've been told both as a compliment and I think as an insult, depending on the person and time in my life, that I think differently than other people, that I always have a different perspective. The ideas I have are different, and I think people have really appreciated that. But some people have found that a barrier because they want people to follow along a little bit more. Did that answer your multi-prong question?



Q

I think it's really I don't think that, like, thinking differently or doing things like that is really like an insult, because I'd rather personally, I'd rather be, like, insulted on, like, like myself rather than being, like, called normal. Like, I think that's, like, it really hits you. Like if someone calls you like normal, like, you're just normal. I feel like that's a bigger one of, like, the biggest insults that you can get because you don't want to be normal. You want to be different, you know?



Melissa

Yeah.



Q

Because being different is, you know, what makes you stand out. It's what makes you not just another cow in the herd or whatever.



Melissa

I love that. I think that's so great. And I think that's just really great that you think that way. I think I spent so much of my childhood trying to fit in and be normal that when I was told that I wasn't, like I just said, I saw it as an insult, and it's so refreshing and great that you think differently. So I'm so proud of you.



Q

Thanks.



Melissa

Alright, T.



T

So you have your point of view, and we all have our point of view. So this is like, I want to know your point of view of this question of what has it been like trying to make all your calls and all your live events, but you're also trying to make lunch for your two starving kids or something.



Melissa

You're hardly starving. But yes, I think it's a balance. I think like all working parents, you have to schedule and prioritize for what's important. So I think what's been really good for us is, one, I always schedule ahead of time in the week. So if you guys have stuff that you need to get to or I have stuff I need to get to, I know our schedule and can accommodate it. You guys have also made it super easy on me because you're really amazing at following direction, and we always have conversations about expectations.


So I will tell you and say I have this call at this time so here I prepped lunch for you or here you can make this or I'll be down at this time to have lunch. And so we just work through together how to best accommodate our schedule so that everyone has their needs met.



T

Yeah.



Melissa

How do you think it's been going for you?



T

I think it's been going good. I mean, it's easier because we're not, like, little so we can do a lot of stuff and we help each other out.



Melissa

Yeah.



T

I have a follow up question, actually.



Melissa

Okay.



T

So do you think you would have followed your dreams if we were likebabies? If they just had, like a three year old and a one year old? I don't know. Would you still have followed your dreams of becoming your coach because you'd have to be taking care of us, feeding us.



Melissa

 I think it definitely would have looked different. So I definitely would not be able to have the work schedule that I do now where I can put times of calls on the door and I can plan your guys' meals ahead of time. And you kind of can take care of yourselves a little bit, and you can understand time and a schedule and all of those things. You're not attached to my hip all the time. Well, sometimes, but not all the time. So I think if I had babies, I think that it would have been more difficult.


I think that how it would have been different. I could have still made it work, but I think I probably would have had to have more help at home, so I would have probably had to chunk my time differently. So maybe take calls only certain times and days of the week, like during your naptimes and things like that, and probably work on the weekends and not so much during the week so that if Ellen were here, she could kind of help take care of you.


And I would probably work a little bit less overall, so my business would look differently, but I would still be able to make it work.



T

Yeah.



Q

Okay. What would you tell someone that wants to be a life coach? Or they're making a big decision in their life, and they don't know if they should take the leap or not, whether that's quitting their job and doing something that they love, or just like any big decision in their life, what would you tell them? What advice would you give them?



Melissa

I would tell them to listen to that voice that they have that tells them that there's something more for them or that tells them that the situation that they're in isn't right for them. I would then tell them to try to really understand if the change they're looking to make is going to solve the root cause of the problem. So sometimes when we're uncomfortable or if we have a bad boss or if we're bored, the next best thing is just to leave the company and go somewhere else.


But then you might be running away from what you have as opposed to running toward what you want. So I think it's important that you understand what you really want. So when you're making that change, you know it's the right one. And then the third piece would really be to understand that you're never going to be ready. So whenever you do something big and scary or new, your brain is always going to offer you reasons not to do it. So at some point you have to decide you're going to take the plunge and trust yourself that no matter what happens, you'll be okay and you'll know how to handle it.



T

Yeah. Have you ever been like, it's a rainy day, it won't stop raining, I'm not in the zone, just want it through the day, relax, watch some 90 day fiance, I don't know.



Q

If you want a gift for her, send her 90 day Fiance items. Buy a Big Ed Cameo and send it to her.



T

Off topic, but yeah.  But you've just not been right head space.



Melissa

Okay. So have I ever had the time where I don't feel like doing my work and I'm not feeling in the mood for it? Yes. Yeah, I definitely have times like that. And so what I do is I for one, I have gotten really good at scheduling my critical priorities every week, and I put them in my calendar. So, for example, like recording the podcast. That's something that I do for every week. So all of those things that are critical priorities, if I schedule them, I do my best to commit to that and to make it happen.


But I also listen to my body and I listen to what I need. And so if I need a break, I take the break. So that's when I come down and say, hey guys, want to play Mario? And then you're like, aren't you supposed to be working? I just need a break. Or I'll get us take out and we'll go have a picnic in the backyard. So sometimes I need to take that break and then I'll just reschedule that priority if it's really important. But I really just try to listen to myself because we're all going to have bad days and we need to listen to what our body needs so that we can show up as the best version of ourselves for ourselves and for others.



Q

Okay, what is your best tip to making the world a better place?



Melissa

Oh my goodness. I would say, which is ironic given that this is a podcast where I'm talking all the time, but I would say to listen more and talk less. Because I think that is, if we were to boil it down to one thing, I think that we can all do better at understanding each other's perspectives and knowing that our experiences, the way we see the world is very egocentric. All of us only see the world the way that we see it. Like, T, you won't see the world the way that Q sees it.


I don't see the world the way that Q sees it. We can understand each other, but the way that we each look at the world is going to be a little bit different. And if we listen to each other, then we can understand each other and then we can have common ground and then we can create some momentum and maybe solve some of the problems we have in the world that could be taken care of but aren't because we all have different priorities and we're not seeing what's really important.



Q

Yeah, totally.



Melissa

How about you, Q? What would be your advice for people?



Q

I haven't lived enough life to know.



Melissa

You haven't lived enough life to know? You have a lot of good ideas.



Q

To make it a better place?



Melissa

Do you want to come back to you?



Q

Do you want to answer?



T

I think something that could make the world better would be this one word. Ready? Acceptance. To everyone. Like you've kind of been saying on the podcast, you know, about acceptance, so I think that would really help a lot.



Melissa

What do you think people can do to show acceptance?



T

They could stop judging people.



Melissa

Okay, that's a good one. Alright, Q, you're up. You're in the hot seat.



Q

I think something that could really help, like if you're trying to just try to make the world like a better place, just like as a person is to try to think about people's perspectives. Try to think about people's perspectives because everyone, you know, they have their own side of the story and, you know, people who might be treating you really badly or treating you really good, they  have their own perspective in everything and anything. Just try to think about other people's perspectives before you make judgments on just like the way people act and things like that.



Melissa

Do you have something to add, T?



T

Yeah. I was just going to say that some of that stuff might be hard for you. So you could do little stuff to help even. You might not help the person, but there's obviously a lot of trash everywhere. So just picking up some things or some trash around can really help change the world, not just your life.



Melissa

Yeah. You are on the green team.



T

Yeah. Are you looking forward to more opportunities your business can get from the future? Like some more publicity, even like go on a news channel, you collab with another podcast? I don't know.



Melissa

Okay. I am looking forward to the future and being able to help more people. So I'm working on some things that are going to be able to help more people and make the way that I help people more accessible. So right now, people have to work with me one-on-one for a few months, and I'm coming up with something new that's going to allow people to get help in a more affordable way and with easier access, but still get great results, and that's really going to have a greater impact on the world.

So I'm excited about that.



T

Yeah.



T

Got a next question, Q-dog, the rapper? 



Q

I'm not a rapper. Okay. So if you, like, had a billboard, what would you say? Like, what would be on it?



T

A quote or something?



Q

Like to advertise your business or whatever. Like, if you bought a billboard. I don't really see you doing that.



Melissa

I don't see myself having a billboard for my business.



Q

No, but if you did, what would be on it? Like, if you owned a billboard, what would you display on it?



Melissa

I think I would put words of encouragement on a billboard for people to see the bright side of their day, to see what's possible for them to help bring them out of a dark cloud or a gloomy time, and to be able to see what's possible and not to give up. 



Q

So are you going to ask us our question?



T

Want to flip flop.



Melissa

Are you guys done with your interrogation interview of me? Okay. So I wanted to ask you guys, what do you want to be when you grow up?



T

I think I might know my answer. I have a lot of, I think I've narrowed it down to three options. I want to have my own animal rescue kind of thing. I kind of want to be like a veterinarian helper or something that doesn't work directly with the animals, but it helps animals. Or I want to be mostly, probably, an actor.



Melissa

Yeah. You are really good at the drama shows. Well, Q, we know you want to be an entrepreneur, right?



Q

Yes. You know, there's lots of things that I would like to do that I possibly could see myself doing. Like, you know, I want to be an entrepreneur.



Melissa

We talked about this. You have to say the word.



Q

Yeah, I know. Entrepreneur. I would really like to impact the world in a certain way or build something, you know, that is going to live on past me.



Melissa

Yeah. You want to have a legacy?



Q

Yeah, sure. Yeah. Whatever really comes to me or whatever I'm into at the time. And once I really find something that I really like to do, I will monetize that. And yeah, I don't know what that is yet, but I'm sure I'll figure it out eventually.



Melissa

I'm sure you will.



Q

And. Yeah.



Melissa

Okay.



Melissa

And what is something? You know, the people that listen to this show are all working professionals. Some of them are parents, some are not. But what do you think they would like to know about me that they don't know?



Q

Oh, I can answer this. Well, I think that something that your listeners and your audience don't know about you is how, like crazy you are. And it's in a good way. It's like very funny. Like we joke around a lot. It's like not. It's like, it's a whole random thing. We have lots of videos of, like her being, like really goofy and funny. Like she has the, you know, enthusiasm when she's like recording these things and posting her stuff. But it's like not even close to, like, what is when you put down the cameras when you're in your natural habitat.



T

 I have like a video of her trying to make Q-dog laugh and she's just like having her hands up in the air and she's just like screaming, and it's really funny. So that's the one thing that's very..



Q

Yeah.



Melissa

Alright. What about you? What would be something that you think that the listeners would want to know?



T

I think they should know how much time you put into this, because you may say how much time you did, but it's really not like compared to as much time that you really put into your business and all of this. And it's really kind of inspiring to show that hard work does really pay off. I know it's kind of cheesy. But yeah. And it's very, like cool to watch you grow over time. And it was definitely very fast grow for you, like right from crawling to walking.


And so I think it was just important they know that she really does mean all of this. And the stuff she says to you is for your best interest. And she's not just saying that because she's, like getting paid or something to. She just really does mean it.



Melissa

Alright. Well, I think that is a great place to end at this episode. So before we do, is there anything you want to add, T?



T

I'd like to say bye. I hope you have a great day.



Melissa

Thanks for being on the show and all of your questions that you surprised me with. That was really neat how you guys prepared all of those and we got to just have this conversation. Alright. Well, I will see you all same time, same place next week. Have a great week.


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